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      CommentAuthormickyd
    • CommentTimeMay 19th 2009
     
    As you can see from the attached pic, the logo nameplate is faded. I tried polishing compound but that didn't improve it at all.

    The raised lettering is only .005" proud from the base surface. I thought about trying canned spray paint then using a razor to remove whatever covers the letters but I wanted to bounce the idea off the forum. Naturally, I am trying to think of how it how it was originally made and then I could try to duplicate that but I'm not familiar with this type of process.

    What do you think?
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    • CommentAuthorBeeg
    • CommentTimeMay 19th 2009
     
    You could spread grease on the unpainted part. Spray it, then after it's dry, wipe it down.
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      CommentAuthorNick
    • CommentTimeMay 19th 2009 edited
     
    I'm thinking "Blue Magic," a few hundred cotton swabs, and a ton of ebow grease. Blue Magic is a rubout compound especially made for restoring old paint finishes. It's available at most auto parts stores.

    With all good wishes,
    Nick
    • CommentAuthorJPG40504
    • CommentTimeMay 20th 2009 edited
     
    Use some of that 'polishing compound' you have. Is it rivited at the top?

    Dusty problem again!

    Worked second time(again).
    •  
      CommentAuthormickyd
    • CommentTimeMay 20th 2009 edited
     
    Polishing compound DIDN'T WORK. The remaining paint (or ink) is not going to come back to life.

    Logo nameplate is secured to the headstock with a #6 x 1/4" "U-Drive Screw"
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    • CommentAuthortreeman
    • CommentTimeMay 20th 2009
     
    If the letters are "proud" of the background and the plate is flat; I might spray the whole thing and then turn it upside down on a flat plate with very fine sandpaper (1000 or better) and sand just until the letters are clean.
    • CommentAuthordusty
    • CommentTimeMay 20th 2009
     
    At the rate you guys are going with these restorations, I won't have a chance of finding and old machine. Keep up the good work.
  1.  
    Micky-

    Have you given some though about just leaving the nameplate alone?

    BPR
    •  
      CommentAuthorDrew
    • CommentTimeJun 1st 2009
     
    That is the easiest answer, Blane. Very simple... :)
    •  
      CommentAuthormickyd
    • CommentTimeJun 1st 2009
     
    Blane, Blane, Blane.......you MUST be kidding......

    I would sooner burn the thing up than leave the logoplate like it is once I do the restoration (or is it refurbish or is it recondition or is it...)

    I decided that I am going to MAKE a new one using a chemical etch process. (similar to the way they make prototype circuit boards) I've got the logo artwork, .032" thick sheet stock and the ferric chloride etching solution already. All I need is the mask material.(called Press-n-Peel).

    I am STILL going to try repainting my original like treeman discusses above but I plan on putting the new one on.
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      CommentAuthorDrew
    • CommentTimeJun 1st 2009
     
    If you, Blane) decide to do this etching solution. Do you reading up. I have done etching before, it is not too difficult, however it is easier to mess up than get right. Timing is everything. Good luck...


    Be good,

    Drew
    • CommentAuthorBlane Ryan
    • CommentTimeJun 1st 2009 edited
     
    Not me. I had my limit on chemicaIs when my wife and I stripped all of the woodwork in our house and refinished it. I still have faint scars on my shins from that little adventure 20 years ago. I would leave the name plate alone just as a reminder of what the machine looked like originally. But that's me. For me, it's kind of like judging a vintage car: you want to keep as much as possible of the original equipment. That reminds me: contact an automotive store or an auto body shop. Maybe they can be of assistance.

    BPR
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      CommentAuthormickyd
    • CommentTimeJun 9th 2009 edited
     
    For anyone interested, I made my first prototype nameplate using the chemical etch process. You can see it at the ShopSmith forum at:

    http://www.shopsmith.net/forums/showpost.htm?p=40674&postcount=59
      Img_6308mod.jpg
    •  
      CommentAuthormickyd
    • CommentTimeJun 15th 2009 edited
     
    Narrowing the process down!! Here's the 2nd prototype of the ShopSmith ER nameplate. Should have a final version in another few days!



    http://www.shopsmith.net/forums/showpost.htm?p=40997&postcount=69
      IMG_6324mod1.JPG
    •  
      CommentAuthormickyd
    • CommentTimeJul 18th 2009 edited
     
    3rd prototype is getting real close!! The white specs in the photo are due to the way the light is shining off it and aren't really there.
      Img_6583mod1.jpg
    •  
      CommentAuthormickyd
    • CommentTimeSep 11th 2009 edited
     
    Here's the finished nameplate made using the acid etch process. I'll be preparing a pdf instructional file on how to do it. Should be ready next weekend. This has been a fun project and improves the cosmetics 1000% as compared to my original.

    Now I have to locate some brass U-drive screws to mount it.
      Img_7202mod.jpg
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