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    Powell feels safer buying his produce at bigger grocery chains with more accountability. Still, he said, with no mandatory testing or information printed on packets, it's impossible for buyers to know what they're getting.

    There have been 34 food-borne illness outbreaks involving leafy vegetables like lettuce and spinach in the past 15 years, Powell says, including a 2006 outbreak linked to contaminated spinach that sickened more than 200 people.

    In the latest lettuce-linked outbreak, 23 people have been confirmed sick with E. coli 0145, a rare strain of the bacteria traced to lettuce harvested from a farm in Yuma, Arizona. No deaths have been reported.

    Two distributors -- Freshway Foods and Vaughan Foods -- [url=http://www.usasmokingsale.com]Buy Newport Cigarettes Wholesale[/url] have voluntarily recalled bagged lettuce that was harvested from that farm.

    The multistate recall once again inflamed public fears about eating lettuce, though at this point, people don't need to be concerned about the entire industry, said Mike Doyle, a nationally known microbiologist who directs the Center for Food Safety at the University of Georgia.

    But, said Doyle, if you want to [url=http://www.usasmokingsale.com]Cheap Carton Of Newport Cigarettes[/url] reduce risks, "buy whole lettuce and cut it yourself."

    Read how to grow your own lettuce

    Often, the bacteria lurk in the outer leaves. Nothing is foolproof, he said, but safety goes up when you toss the outer leaves and wash your hands properly.

    Food safety lawyer Bill Marler said consumers should not give up eating a good thing out of fear. He also suggested that whole lettuce was a safer [url=http://www.vonderhain.com/marlboro]Free Carton Of Newport Cigarettes[/url] option than the bagged variety.