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    • CommentAuthorrld
    • CommentTimeJun 1st 2009
     
    There are many ways to hang cabinets on the wall. Probably the best way would be to screw the back of the cabinet directly into the wall studs. Often times, depending upon the size of the cabinet, only one stub may be available. The French Cleat, is a fascinating way to hang cabinets also because installing the wall side of the cleat level is much easier than leveling a cabinet. My concern is...fastening the cabinet side of the cleat to the cabinet. Is the cleat fastened to the cabinet by screws through the top into the cleat and from the sides into the cleat? Is there another way to fasten the cleat? Also the cabinet back must be inset by the depth of the cleat thereby losing some depth albeit very minor. The loss of depth could be a non factor if the original design took the depth into consideration.
    Am I missing something?

    Bob
    San Diego
    •  
      CommentAuthorNick
    • CommentTimeJun 1st 2009
     
    Just so folks know what you mean by "french cleat," I added a photo at the bottom. The top cleat is normally attached to the sides and top of the cabinet, the bottom cleat is attached to the wall -- hopefully, to the studs in the wall. There are two ways to attach the top cleat. I have seen then attached to the back edges of the top and sides, and I have seen them inset in the cabinet, atached to the bottom face of the top and the inside faces of the side. Whenever I've used french cleats, I've always inset them and used pocket screws to attach them to the cabinet parts. I put the pockets on the back of the cleat so they can't be seen when the cabinet is installed.

    If you're concerned about depth, reconsider a single solid cleat that's attached directly to the cabinet and the wall. Build yourself a set of "dead men" for easier installation. These take the pain out of leveling the cabinet and holding it in place while you drive screws and mollies.

    With all good wishes,
    Nick
      French cleat.jpg
  1.  
    This cleat is what I used on my shop cabinet and it works great!

    BPR
    •  
      CommentAuthorDrew
    • CommentTimeJun 1st 2009
     
    It is an easy way to do it, for sizzle!

    :)
    • CommentAuthormangoman
    • CommentTimeJun 2nd 2009 edited
     
    French cleats rock, especially when hanging cabinets solo (most of the time in my shop). Once the cabinet is in place, I usually run a couple of screws through the cabinet into the wall cleat. I know the weight of a loaded cabinet won't go anywhere, but it's cheap peace of mind here in earthquake country!

    Note to self: Remember to remove screws if moving the cabinets. Life will be much easier:)

    Edit: mm
  2.  
    Has anyone used these to hang kitchen cabinets?

    BPR
    •  
      CommentAuthorDrew
    • CommentTimeJun 3rd 2009
     
    Nope, but I wish I had. You know, hind sight is 20/20. It will work however.
    • CommentAuthorrld
    • CommentTimeJun 6th 2009
     
    Nick
    You wrote in your response above...If you're concerned about depth, reconsider a single solid cleat that's attached directly to the cabinet and the wall.
    Please explain I don't understand what you mean by "a single solid cleat".
    Bob
    San Diego
    •  
      CommentAuthorNick
    • CommentTimeJun 7th 2009 edited
     
    Solid cleat: Also known as a hanging strip or nailing strip. See drawing.

    With all good wishes,
    Nick
      D34-3s.jpg
    • CommentAuthorrld
    • CommentTimeJun 8th 2009
     
    Got it! Now I understand. Thanks for the clarification.
    Bob
    San Diego
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