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    • CommentAuthorrld
    • CommentTimeJun 6th 2009
     
    I need a foolproof finishing tip. I have sanded some kitchen cutting boards and added a maple strip as a finger pull. The cutting board itself will be coated with Butcher block oil. I want to apply a dark stain to the maple finger pulls.
    I need a foolproof method to stain the finger pull and not have the stain bleed onto the cutting board surface. I could use blue painters tape and carefully tape off the cutting board, but I’m afraid that the stain might run or bleed under the tape.
    Does someone have a finishing suggestion that will allow me to stain the finger pulls and not get stain on the cutting board surface?
    Thanks in advance
    Bob
    San Diego
      cutting boards.jpg
  1.  
    Other than removing the finger pulls before staining, I don't know of any foolproof way. Maybe using tape on the boards and a jell stain that won't run will work. In the future I would suggest staining before attaching.
    • CommentAuthorBeeg
    • CommentTimeJun 6th 2009
     
    Is there any gap between the 2 boards, where ya can slip some wax paper? I'd say use the butcher block oil first, but that's the reverse problem. :)
    •  
      CommentAuthorNick
    • CommentTimeJun 7th 2009
     
    Sometimes you need to take a step backwards before you can move forward again. The suggestion of staining the maple before attaching it was the most "foolproof" so far. They should be easily detachable. The standard method for adding breadboard ends to cutting boards is to use nails or screws. These bend slightly as the cutting board expands and contracts. Can't you just back out the screws or pry up the pulls? If you've glued the pulls in place with the wood grain of the pulls restricting the expansion and contraction of the cutting boards, then your staining problems are by far the least of your worries.

    With all good wishes,
    Nick
    • CommentAuthorrld
    • CommentTimeJun 8th 2009
     
    Apparently Nick, I'm in for big trouble. I attached the finger pulls using #20 biscuits and yellow glue. So no, I can't pry to pulls away, I would have to cut them off. It appears I have made a dumb rookie mistake by not taking the movement of the wood into account. Therefore, that mistake begs the following question. Do you always use mechanical fasteners or "joints that move" when joining boards that are perpendicular to each other versus joining boards where the grain is parallel to each other, such as a panel? Would that be a true statement?

    Bob
    San Diego
    •  
      CommentAuthorNick
    • CommentTimeJun 8th 2009
     
    Don't feel bad -- or even stupid. We were all rookies once, and I have made even more costly mistakes. I once made a beautiful walnut briefcase. The top and bottom were supposed to float in slots routed into the front, back, and sides, but I glued them in place. The briefcase looked good for about a week, then began to warp and twist out of control. Within a month you couldn't even close it.

    In answer to your question, no, you don't always use hardware. But you always need to allow the wood to move -- plan on about 1/4" of movement for every 12" of width across the grain. There are many, many different wood joints and wood-hardware joints that allow for movement. (You might want to get a copy of "Joining Wood" by Nick Engler; it covers this subject fairly well.) In your case, one of the simplest methods would heve been to use flathead wood screws. Drill and countersink the screw holes so the heads are flush with the bottom surface of the pulls. Then go back an enlarge the shank holes in the pulls slightly. When the pulls are installed, the enlarged shank holes will allow the screws to bend slightly as the wood expands and contracts.

    With all good wishes,
    Nick
    • CommentAuthorJPG40504
    • CommentTimeJun 8th 2009
     
    Forget staining it! Finish it natural as it is. If the darker 'color' IS a necessity, either veneer it or "GASP" stick on pseudo vinyl wood.

    If you really really want to try staining it, stop short of the joint. The 'unstained area' would be small(although uneven) and in a not too obvious area. A more adventuresome 'idea' would be to cut a slot(somehow) at the joint, stain a 'plug' with the pull and glue it into the slot after staining. This is desperate wag'ing(w = wild, g = guessing).
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