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      CommentAuthormickyd
    • CommentTimeMay 19th 2009
     
    Anyone interested on weighing in on the best type of finish to apply to the wooden bench supports on an ER10 and why you would use it? Would it be varnish, polyurethance, something else similar? I really like a finish that has a lot of depth to it, as you see in the classic antique wooden boats.
    • CommentAuthordusty
    • CommentTimeMay 19th 2009
     
    For that particular application I would say "Just don't paint it"! That, in my opinion needs to be a natural finish. What wood are you going to use in the restoration?
    • CommentAuthorJPG40504
    • CommentTimeMay 19th 2009
     
    You know Mr. 'Original" will refinish the 'bench that came with it'! Mike I would go get something prettier, overlay it and finish with fiberglass(like a boat/ChrisCraft).
    •  
      CommentAuthorNick
    • CommentTimeMay 19th 2009 edited
     
    My favorite finish for shop furniture is a homemade recipe that lathe-turning-guru Rudy Olsolnik turned me onto years ago. He said take a cup of tung oil finish and mix it with two tablespoons of spar varnish. The tung oil contributes flexible alkyd resins, the spar varnish hard phenols. What you get is a durable finish that penetrates the wood for a good bond and easily moves with the wood as it expands and contracts. These days, I substitute Spar Urethane for spar varnish, but the principle remains the same. I've applied this stuff to shop furniture, jigs, fixtures, and airplanes with good results. I have a drill press table that I've used day in and day out for 15 years and the finish is barely worn.

    With all good wishes,
    Nick
    •  
      CommentAuthormickyd
    • CommentTimeMay 19th 2009 edited
     
    dusty - I am going to initially try restoring (preserving) the present bench wood. I am not sure what kind of wood it is yet. I'll be figuring that out shortly. As far as painting or a natural wood finish, I am leaning toward natural wood finish but still need to find out what it came with originally.

    jpg - You sure do know me. Yes, yours truly, Mr. Original. I have a friend of mine that bought what is called a "gray boat", a 1951 Philippine mahogany Chris Craft that sat outside for many, many years uncovered. There was no dry rot but it looked absolutely horrible. He restored that boat and you would NEVER in a million years have suspected that it was ever a gray boat. Well, I am going to bring it back to life.

    My wood really isn't all that bad. See photo below.

    And re: your "fiberglass(like a boat/ChrisCraft)" comment......Blasphemy!! That's 50+ coats of varnish you’re looking at on a true wooden boat restoration.

    Nick - I will consider your "secret" blend.
      Img_5352mod.jpg
    • CommentAuthorJPG40504
    • CommentTimeMay 19th 2009
     
    I am guessing Spruce/Pine/Fir! Did NOT mean to imply YOUR CC had Fiberglass finish! I was speaking 'generically'!!!

    The Dusty Curse struck again!
    • CommentAuthorTooljunkie
    • CommentTimeMay 23rd 2009
     
    I would bet that it is probably southern pine. That's what most of the older two by lumber was.
    •  
      CommentAuthormickyd
    • CommentTimeMay 29th 2009
     
    As I get ready to start the restoration of my old new ER10, I've decided for preservation reasons that I am going to attempt to restore the existing bench wood. From the picture above, you can see that the wood has grayed considerably from being unfinished and left outside. It's still solid, no rot, but the color needs to be improved and there are several spots that have narrow gaps between the woods growth rings. I

    I've seen "gray" wooden boats that have been restored and they have looked beautiful after the restoration but I don't know the restoration technique that was used. I know (think) bleach was involved but that's it.

    Anyone have experience they'd like to share on how I can best get this wood looking respectable? Not looking for a brand new look, just a VERY MUCH improved look.
    • CommentAuthorlv2wdwrk
    • CommentTimeMay 29th 2009 edited
     
    I would start with the same process used to revive a wood deck.
    • CommentAuthorBeeg
    • CommentTimeMay 29th 2009
     
    Ya know it took a long time for those boards to get "grayed". Why knot just clean em up a bit and use Nicks blend on them?
    •  
      CommentAuthormickyd
    • CommentTimeMay 29th 2009 edited
     
    lv2wdwrkCommentTime3 hours ago .......I would start with the same process used to revive a wood deck.

    mickyd....Good idea lv2wdwrk. You mean that spray on deck cleaning solution, right?

    BeegCommentTime2 hours ago .......Ya know it took a long time for those boards to get "grayed". Why knot just clean em up a bit and use Nicks blend on them?

    mickyd......Not too keen on the gray look. This is strickly a cosmetic preference. I don't know how it would look with Niclk's blend on it. Maybe I'll try a sample on the underside. For that matter, I guess I should look at the underside. That might be in better condition and I could just flip the boards over.....ya, that's it....new plan of attack. Thanks Beeg!
    • CommentAuthordusty
    • CommentTimeMay 29th 2009
     
    I sort of prefer the worn look but this is a restoration and not a reconditioning. That implies that you are attempting to go back to the "as new" condition. This would cause me to either replace the boards or run these through the planer and jointer to get to new wood.

    Has it been determined what that wood would be? JPG said spruce/pine/fir; I expect yellow pine.
    •  
      CommentAuthormickyd
    • CommentTimeMay 29th 2009
     
    dusty

    I may be using the word "restoration" differently than I am used to in this woodworking forum. Being a classic wooden boat owner, a restoration is making every attempt to keep things original. Some things however like the boats bottom is NOT expected to remain original and in a judging, they wouldn't deduct for having a new bottom put on. With the BEST CARE, a bottom on a Chris Craft will remain structurally sound for only about 15 years. Change the top deck on the boat however and no matter how good it looks, a beat up one carefully and professionally restored will have more value. I feel that same way about the bench wood. Do the best you can with what you have. That would exclude the planer and jointer again unless absolutely necessary but I don't think they are that far gone.

    So I guess here, I'll call it "recondition" if that the correct term because that Is what I am shooting for....keeping everything original except......my brass nameplate that I am going to make an put on it AND, I think I just gotta polish the aluminum handles, knobs, etc. like I did on my Greenie in the ShopSmith forum at http://www.shopsmith.net/forums/showpost.htm?p=37606&postcount=293.
    (Nothing like talking out of both sides of my mouth, huh!!!!)

    Have not made a determination on what type of wood is used on the bench. I would need someone to share some expertise on how I can tell. I have no idea but would like to know.
    • CommentAuthorBeeg
    • CommentTimeMay 29th 2009
     
    HAND SAND it with 220 grit paper, till it's the way ya want it. LOL
    •  
      CommentAuthormickyd
    • CommentTimeMay 29th 2009
     
    Gee thanks beeg. Is that wet or dry!!!!
    • CommentAuthorBeeg
    • CommentTimeMay 29th 2009
     
    Dry on top. Wet on the bottom. On the end grain do half of each.
    •  
      CommentAuthorNick
    • CommentTimeMay 30th 2009 edited
     
    "Have not made a determination on what type of wood is used on the bench."
    Mostly likely candidates are Hemlock or Southern Yellow Pine, owing to the wide bands of summerwood. My guess is pine because of the knots and because it's more common than hemlock. (See http://www.workshopcompanion.com/KnowHow/Wood/Hardwoods_&_Softwoods/3_Physical_Properties/Physical_Properties_Table_2.htm#PineSY )

    The chemical most often used to restore the color of weathered woods in boat restoration is oxalic acid, as you are probably well aware, Micky. I know it works well on teak and mahogany, but I have no experience or knowledge of how it might work on pine. You might look into stuff like this: http://www.napiere.com/pdf1/woodwash392.pdf . Chemicals like these are normally a mild acid or bleach with cupric sulfate mixed in. The acid/bleach destroys the greyed wood fibers, the cupric sulfate kills any fungus or mildew and helps preserve the wood from further decay.

    With all good wishes,
    Nick
    •  
      CommentAuthormickyd
    • CommentTimeAug 16th 2009 edited
     
    Still interested in trying to determine the specific wood used on my ShopSmith ER 10 bench boards. I have cleaned them up pretty well so they clearly show the grain. Based on the wood identification link that Nick provided in the previous post, it is closer in appearance to the hemlock than the southern pine.

    When I hand planed the sides of the boards, I was albe to detect a very slight aroma of pine but it didn't smell like the northern pine that I recall as I grew up in northeastern Connecticut. Having never smelled hemlock, can anyone who has describe if hemlock has a slight pine aroma OR is it quite different?
      Img_6906mod1.jpg
      Wood Hemlock Pine Compare_Raw_250.jpg
      Wood Hemlock Pine Comparison_Lineup_814.jpg
    •  
      CommentAuthormickyd
    • CommentTimeAug 16th 2009 edited
     
    .......QUOTE......
    Nick May 19th 2009
    My favorite finish for shop furniture is a homemade recipe that lathe-turning-guru Rudy Olsolnik turned me onto years ago. He said take a cup of tung oil finish and mix it with two tablespoons of spar varnish. The tung oil contributes flexible alkyd resins, the spar varnish hard phenols. What you get is a durable finish that penetrates the wood for a good bond and easily moves with the wood as it expands and contracts. These days, I substitute Spar Urethane for spar varnish, but the principle remains the same. I've applied this stuff to shop furniture, jigs, fixtures, and airplanes with good results. I have a drill press table that I've used day in and day out for 15 years and the finish is barely worn.

    With all good wishes,
    Nick
    ......END QUOTE......

    Nick - Any chance of you posting a photo of the finish that you desribe in the post above? I'm getting close to preparing my bench boards and would like to see it if possible.
    •  
      CommentAuthorNick
    • CommentTimeAug 19th 2009
     
    Go to the home page -- http://www.workshopcompanion.com/ -- and look at the mule chest and the "tool shrine" beyond it. They are both finished with the Osolnik recipe.

    With all good wishes,
    Nick
    •  
      CommentAuthormickyd
    • CommentTimeOct 9th 2009
     
    I've purchased the tung oil and spar urethane for the homemade finish recipe that lathe-turning-guru Rudy Olsolnik came up with.

    Few questions before I start applying to my ER 10 bench boards:

    Wood prep stopping at 150 grit OK or should I go higher?
    Should the finish be applied with foam brush, wipe on appication, or other method?
    Is it a multi-coat finish and if so, how many?
    If multi-coat, light sanding between coats required and if so, what grit?

    Very anxious to see what it looks like appied. I've made good progress at getting my original boards looking real nice. Virtually all of the black water stains are now gone after several baths with the oxalic acid / H2O mix.
    •  
      CommentAuthormickyd
    • CommentTimeOct 19th 2009
     
    see above post.....any input?
    • CommentAuthorJPG40504
    • CommentTimeOct 20th 2009
     
    My GUESS would be one coat applied however you 'prefer'. Just keep it even. Go to 220 followed with steel wool b4 finishing!
    •  
      CommentAuthormickyd
    • CommentTimeNov 5th 2009
     
    Any other "guesses "on if this should be a multicoat finish? I applied one coat last night and it looks like it is dying for more. Both the tung oil and spar urethane both say multicoat after 24 hours, to 3 or more.

    Nick.....I think that you are the only one with first hand experience with the finish. Not that I don't trust jpg....he hasn't steered me wrong yet, but just in case this is this first time that the steering is off.......comments?
    •  
      CommentAuthormickyd
    • CommentTimeJun 23rd 2010 edited
     
    How rude of me. I never even posted the final results on my bench board refurb. Nick's post #4 recommended the formula of 1 Cup Tung Oil to 2 Tbsp Spar Varnish. By accident, I mixed 1/2 Cup Tung Oil to 2 Tbsp. of Spar Varnish.....

    Here's the before and after. I applied a total of 11 coats. Just couldn't stop myself.
      IMG_5958mod800.JPG
      Img_0026mod.jpg
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